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Structural Integrity

As it applies to us humans, I believe structural integrity consists of two things—individual and the relational conduct. Staying centered in integrity means pursuing the people and experiences that make you feel the most alive, the most seen and valued, and, subsequently, the most nourished. From this place, we are far better citizens of the world. But structural integrity also means being impeccable with your word, showing up all the times and in all the ways you said that you would. It means bearing, with grace, whatever load it is you promised you’d carry. —Alessandra Wollner

source: http://journal.burningman.org/2016/09/opinion/serious-stuff/structural-integrity-how-it-feels-to-choose-burning-man-and-nearly-blow-up-your-life/

The thing about riding a carousel

The thing about riding a carousel is that it gives you the illusion of progress and traveling, but when it’s time to get off, you realize that you never went anywhere at all, and you may even feel a little queasy.

Caveat Magister 2016

The point being that this kind of collective environment appears to allow for the restoration of symbolic resources in individuals – even if the content of those resources is not collective, or even shared. The existence of the sacred liminal space itself is sufficient collective infrastructure to support individual’s symbolic resources.

Caveat Magister in What I’ve learned about Burning Man from reading “Culture and the Death of God.”

The Temple of Flux is Still Out There

Deep in preparations for my fourth burn, I was linked to an online preview of MetropoLOVE by Karen Kuehn. It’s a book of extraordinary photography mostly taken at Burning Man 2010. Among the beautiful images and quotes, I had to pause on this image of the Temple of Flux:

Temple of Flux photo by Karen KuehnI love this image because it captures the clean walls of the temple before it was literally covered in messages and artifacts brought to it by the community. I wasn’t able to witness the temple burn with my own eyes that year, so to some degree, I can still believe the Temple of Flux is still standing out there on the playa … somewhere. Accepting and sheltering all who need it.

Out of the desert grew a ritual,
a celebration,
a participatory moment

Out of the moment grew a need
A need fulfilled by a temple
A place to let go,
to remember,
to celebrate

The temple became a tradition
It grew from the playa,
from the temporary city,
from the culture
Its methods were ours,
its tradition was ours
It became a part of our city

And a part of us.
– Jess Hobbs